Liposuction, or the surgical removal of fat deposits, is one of the most common plastic surgery treatments performed today. In fact, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports that nearly a quarter million Americans underwent liposuction in 2014. There are several different methods of performing liposuction, and it can be administered as a standalone treatment, or in conjunction with procedures such as abdominoplasty (tummy tuck), breast lift, face lift, and most body contouring treatments.
Next, your surgeon will insert a thin vacuum tube, called a cannula, through the incision and into the deep fat layer. Your surgeon will move the cannula back and forth to break up the fat cells, and, with the help of an attached syringe or vacuum pump, suction them out. Because a significant amount of blood and other bodily fluids are removed along with the fat, you will receive replacement fluids intravenously during and after the liposuction procedure. Of course, this part of the procedure can vary somewhat, depending on the type of liposuction you select.
"I placed the embrace® strips right over the areas of incision and they were great because they relieved the tension from my everyday movements, which helped to prevent more scarring. They also had silicone in the tape to help soften the scars. I didn't have to worry about remembering to apply gel or damaging my clothes, and my biggest fear of not having the surgery done in the first place  was no longer a problem. Now, months after the procedure, my scars are all white and barely even noticeable."
However, minimizing the appearance of scars on the breast will be of vital importance to your surgeon. The whole point of a breast lift procedure is to make the breast more attractive, and conspicuous or heavy scarring defeats that point. Most scars will typically heal and fade within two years, but will always be present. Your surgeon will consider it a part of their job to keep these scars discrete, not a bonus. They may also prescribe cortisone cream and use silicone sheeting to help reduce the appearance of scars after surgery.

It's not unusual to see lumpy areas after the swelling starts to go down. This should improve after a few weeks, but wearing a compression garment can help prevent lumps. Less commonly, patients can have a hematoma (a temporary pooling of blood under the skin) or seroma (a pocket of fluid under the skin that requires draining by your doctor); changes in skin color or sensation; or scarring from thermal burning, either above or below the skin (usually an issue only with laser- and ultrasound-assisted lipo, if skin ports aren’t used). If you’re concerned about anything you experience as you recover, don’t hesitate to call your doctor.
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You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.
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