When there is saggy tissue in the lower pole and the areola needs to be raised a large amount, a lollipop (vertical) lift or anchor (Wise pattern) lift are better options.  You are a much better candidate for one of these two options.  These approaches help cone the breast for a perky look but both require the vertical scar you mentioned.  The anchor lift adds an additional scar hidden within the breast fold that is not very visible.  The anchor lift removes more excess skin than the lollipop lift and is better suited in certain patients.  In general, all of these scars tend to heal very well.  However, each person scars differently with some people making more prominent scars than others.  In many cases, a greatly improved breast shape is worth the tradeoff of a well-healed scar.  
In addition to your surgeon's fee, you can expect to pay fees for the surgical venue, anesthesia, supportive surgical garments, pain medication, and other possible needs. Many surgeons have their own surgical suite, staffed by their own nurses and other professionals. If your surgery must be carried out in a hospital suite, it can cost hundreds more. In fact, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation reports that non-profit hospitals charge an average fee of about $2,300 for an outpatient procedure, while state and for-profit hosptials charge an average of about $1,800. However, in some instances, the hospital is the better choice. If you need extensive liposuction, complications are more probable, and it pays to have a hospital's resources available.
Liposuction is highly effective in removing stubborn fat cells that seem immune to diet and exercise. However, if you have not yet made a commitment to a healthy lifestyle, you should make these changes before pursuing liposuction. You may find that, with the right modifications, the areas that have troubled you for years become firmer and more contoured.
At first, liposuction results may seem minimal. This is standard, as swelling and bruising can obscure the final effects. Skin in the treated area may also appear loose, as it takes time for your body to adjust to its new, slender shape. Most physicians will ask the patient to wear a compression garment to aid in recovery. This will help reduce the long-term effects of post-liposuction swelling, bruising, and scarring.
Liposuction is not a weight loss procedure, and it cannot eliminate stretch marks and cellulite from the skin. The treatment can only remove small, localized concentrations of fat. In most cases, ten pounds of fat or less will be removed from the treated area. The ideal liposuction candidate is already close to or at a healthy weight but is interested in subtle body contouring.
According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery®, liposuction is the second most popular cosmetic procedure in the country, surpassed only by breast augmentation. In 2012, the ASAPS there were 313,011 liposuction procedures performed in the US in 2012. While liposuction is the second most popular surgical procedure in general, it is the number one treatment for men seeking cosmetic surgery.[2]
Many patients are concerned about the potential risks involved in liposuction. The truth is, while liposuction can have adverse effects, the treatment is very safe when it is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon. Unfortunately, with the increasing popularity of the procedure, more and more doctors offer the procedure, and not all of them are experienced with this treatment. This is another reason that patients should take the time to find a highly qualified surgeon for their liposuction.
Liposuction evolved from work in the late 1960s from surgeons in Europe using techniques to cut away fat, which were limited to regions without many blood vessels due to the amount of bleeding the technique caused.[16] In the mid-1970s Arpad and Giorgio Fischer created the technique of using a blunt cannula linked to suction; they used it only to remove fat on the outer thighs.[18] Yves-Gerard Illouz and Fournier extended the Fischers' work to the whole body, which they were able to use by using different sized cannulae.[16] Yves-Gerad Illouz later developed the "wet" technique in which the fat tissue was injected with saline and hyaluronidase, which helped dissolve tissue holding the fat, prior to suctioning.[16] Lidocaine was also added as a local anesthetic.[16] Fournier also advocated using compression after the operation, and travelled and lectured to spread the technique.[16] The Europeans had performed the procedures under general anesthesia; in the 1980s American dermatologists pioneered techniques allowing only local anesthetics to be used.[16] Jeffrey Klein published a method that became known as "tumescent" in which a large volume of very dilute lidocaine, along with epinephrine to help control bleeding via vasoconstriction, and sodium bicarbonate as a buffering agent.[16]
Abdominal Etching: This specialized form of liposuction is designed to enhance the abdominal muscles and give patients a desirable set of "six-pack abs." The surgeon will first outline the muscles and then the thin layer of fat that can obscure these muscles. He or she may use traditional, ultrasound, or laser assisted techniques to perform this minimal recovery treatment.
If you have been told that you require liposuction for medical reasons, you can be certain that insurance will only cover the extent of treatment needed to relieve your symptoms. In many cases, this amount of treatment is not going to result in flattering aesthetics. As such, you should consider the benefits of paying for further treatment that will help you not only achieve relief, but also an aesthetic enhancement that can help you feel confident about your appearance. Many practices, including mine, will work with patients in need of liposuction for medical reasons to determine a more comprehensive treatment plan, often at a discounted rate.
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