I had a consultation today for a breast lift with implant. I really do not want that long verticle scar that accompanies most breast lifts. The surgeon measured me and said I was a 29? He said that I would need the lift with the anchor incision, or I could just have the implant without lift, but the implant would go on top of the muscle. I'm really dissapointed because I do not want that large vertical scar. What are my other options for a lift? I have another consultation scheduled with a different surgeon, but I want to know if they are just going to tell me the same thing.
Cellulite is caused by fat cells pushing through the collagen, the connective tissue directly beneath the skin's surface, causing a dimpled appearance. The appearance of cellulite is not related to the amount of body fat an individual has and is prevalent even in healthy and underweight people. Cellulite is more common in women because men have a tighter collagen mesh pattern beneath their skin. Liposuction can help aid cellulite removal in both men and women, but it is important to remember that there is no permanent "cure" for cellulite. The success of cellulite removal is dependent on many factors, including genetics. Because of this, patients should not expect liposuction to eliminate cellulite from their bodies.
The horizontal mastopexy goes by many names, including the “Horndesky Method” and “Ultimate Lift.” This technique enables surgeons to create a new position for the nipple without leaving a vertical scar from the areola to the breast crease. Instead, a horizontal incision is made across the entire breast above the areola, and the surgeon excises the skin below it while preserving the nipple.

The technique used for your procedure will also influence the appearance of your scars, so talk to your surgeon to get a complete explanation of the typical scarring associated with each technique, including the standard (anchor) breast lift surgery, doughnut mastopexy, and crescent lift techniques. Together, you can determine which option would work best in your particular case.

If a man's breasts are enlarged with glandular tissue, liposuction is not an option and other hormonal or medication therapies should be pursued. If the breasts are asymmetrical or oddly shaped, the patient should be examined for possible tumors prior to any surgical intervention. A mammogram is the most effective method for detecting tumors and the possible presence of male breast cancer. After proper testing, a physician can help a patient determine the best course of action.

You’re going to feel sore, especially during the first few days after liposuction. You’ll be swollen and bruised, and you’ll need a few days to rest before you head back to work. “I generally recommend that my patients take between three and seven days off after liposuction, depending on how many areas were worked on and your pain tolerance,” says Dr. Samuel Sohn, a plastic surgeon in Henderson, Nevada. Your doctor will prescribe pain medication, though you may find you need only an over-the-counter pain reliever.
You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.
×