Severe complications associated with liposuction are extremely rare, but should be taken into consideration when deciding whether liposuction is right for you. These complications include adverse reactions to anesthesia, cardiac arrest, cardiac arrhythmia, internal blood clots, excessive bleeding, severe drug interactions, allergic reactions to medication, permanent nerve damage, seizures, and brain damage from anesthesia.
I recently performed liposuction for Tara, 49, an active woman who wanted to rejuvenate her figure.  "Diet and exercise were not enough at this juncture in my life," Tara said. "I wanted to look - and, more importantly - feel better about my appearance both in and out of my clothes. It was definitely worth the cost. Self-confidence is always worth the cost."
For tumescent liposuction, the most common technique, your doctor will make one or more small (one-quarter inch or less) incisions in the area to be treated and inject a large quantity of a mixture of saline (salt water), local anesthesia, and epinephrine into your tissue. The fluid causes the fat to become swollen, firm, and easier to remove. (It also constricts your blood vessels, which reduces bruising, blood loss, and recovery time.) The surgeon then inserts the cannula through the same incision and passes it back and forth under the skin to break up the fat before suctioning it out. For a very small area, the procedure takes around 30 minutes, while a 360 liposuction—which includes the abdomen, flanks, back, and all around the torso—lasts three to four hours. 
Botox Breast Lift: There are more and more uses of Botox that researchers are finding as time goes on. A Botox Breast Lift is not an approved use of botox by the FDA. Here’s how it works: Botox is injected into your pectoralis muscle. This causes a relaxation of the muscles in the chest and your back muscles then begin to lift your breast. The lifting is not dramatic though and it only lasts about three to four months. The advantage, however, is that there are no scars because surgery was not done. There’s also no recovery time as there is with a breast lift surgery.
Tumescent Liposuction : Tumescent liposuction is similar to traditional liposuction, but experts often hail its innovative use of medication and reduced risks for complications. During tumescent liposuction, the doctor will inject a special solution (a mixture of salt solution, lidocaine, and epinephrine) into the layer of fat. The amount of fluid is usually measured at three times that of the fat being removed. The solution swells the fat cells, making them easier to isolate and remove. It also shrinks blood vessels, and because it contains local anesthesia, it can help ease discomfort without the risks associated with general anesthesia. Any minimal risks involve how much of the solution is injected, and how much lidocaine it contains.
Liposuction is a surgical procedure that removes fat via suction. It’s typically done with a thin tube, called a cannula, attached to a vacuum. No matter how healthy your diet or how often you work out, you can still have pockets of unwanted fat that resist your best efforts. With liposuction, an experienced surgeon can remove fat, contouring your hips, thighs, stomach, abs, waist, chin, or other areas. 
First, a circumareolar incision is made to remove a doughnut-shaped area of skin from around the areola. This also allows the nipple-areola complex to be moved up significantly (potentially as much as 8 or 9 centimeters) without causing irregularities, and it leaves almost no visible scars. The skin is then separated from the breast tissue, and the inverted-T technique is used internally to shape and mold the breast tissue. Once your perky, better-defined breast is formed, the skin is redraped. To prolong and maintain your results, a mesh is added as an internal bra beneath the skin. This provides additional support to the breast tissue.

While I would need to examine you in person, 29 may be the distance in centimeters from sternal notch to nipple. That measurement is relatively long, implying that you have a significant amount of ptosis or sag. From your image, I would actually say that you don’t need the anchor incision breast lift, which requires the greatest scar burden, but it does appear that you would be best suited for a vertical breast lift with an incisional scar around the areola plus one down the lower pole of the breast. To achieve the degrees of lift you likely need, you need that vertical incision.


To answer this question, you have to consider how breasts change over time. Weight gain adds a lot of excess tissue to the breasts; and if this weight is lost, it’s possible that there will be sagging – whether or not there already has been a breast lift surgical procedure done. Thus, to predict how long-lasting your results will be, you have to predict whether you will have additional weight gain – and weight loss in the future.
×