Because each patient has individual nutritional and lifestyle needs, there is no set diet that a person should follow after liposuction. Many patients use liposuction as a way to jump-start a healthier lifestyle, using their physical and financial investment in the procedure as motivation to take better care of their bodies. In general, patients should eat plenty of lean protein, calcium-rich dairy products, fresh produce, and whole grains. They should also increase their water consumption and cut back on processed foods. For more personalized diet advice, patients may want to consider visiting with a nutritionist.
Good skin tone is essential to a good outcome, since the skin needs to snap back into the body’s new contours once the fat is removed. “If a patient has good skin elasticity, they’re going to have a really good result,” says New York plastic surgeon Dr. John Mesa. “But if the patient has bad elasticity, like a woman who’s had multiple pregnancies and the skin on her belly is too stretched, the skin isn’t going to shrink—and you’ll be left with sagging” (unless lipo is paired with a tummy tuck).
While I would need to examine you in person, 29 may be the distance in centimeters from sternal notch to nipple. That measurement is relatively long, implying that you have a significant amount of ptosis or sag. From your image, I would actually say that you don’t need the anchor incision breast lift, which requires the greatest scar burden, but it does appear that you would be best suited for a vertical breast lift with an incisional scar around the areola plus one down the lower pole of the breast. To achieve the degrees of lift you likely need, you need that vertical incision.

Congratulations on caring enough for yourself to get the body you want. As excited as you may be by the immediate results, you want to make sure you heal your best, with embrace® Active Scar Defense. It’s the only scar treatment that’s clinically proven to help prevent the appearance of dark, raised, visible scars and is recommended by doctors and patients. Here’s what you need to know:
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