During these first two weeks some minor swelling and discomfort is normal. You should be able to control any pain with ibuprofen or your prescriptions. Be sure to stick to only these medications for controlling your pain. Medicines like aspirin or Advil can thin your blood, which can cause complications in the new blood vessels forming within the fat transfer.
Just like most other surgical procedures, there are complications and risks that are involved with the Brazilian Butt Lift. Because this procedure involves a fat transfer and liposuction to achieve a more attractive and youthful look, both of these techniques have their own set of risks including asymmetry, hematoma, infection, embolism, overcorrection, prolonged swelling, fat necrosis, under-correction, and nerve damage
The best reaction came from my mum, who is always honest. She isn’t afraid to tell me I look tired, pale or spotty, but when I saw her after my treatment she couldn’t have been more complimentary. After confiding in her that I had botox she yelped and said, ‘Wow you did really need it, now you look so fresh, like you’ve had a month of great sleep’. Thanks mum.
Many patients want to know how much fat actually survives. This is a very relevant question to ask, but it's also incredibly difficult to accurately answer. Most conservative estimates put the survival rate of transferred fat at roughly 50%, although many surgeons claim to be able to save a more significant amount. The fat that remains after 3 months of recovery will be your actual final result, not the results immediately after surgery.
Generally, you can go back to working out two to three weeks after breast lift or breast reduction surgery. This depends on how you feel. Do not lift anything that weighs more than five pounds for three weeks. Avoid contact sports for six weeks. If you had breast enlargement with a breast lift, hereafter avoid all exercises which isolate your pectoralis muscles as these can shift the implant toward you armpit. Workouts must stop if you experience discomfort in your breasts or chest. A balance of rest and reduced activity will speed up your recovery.
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